Other observances

Canada, like many other countries of the world, has identified holidays that are of religious and historical significance to the nation. The nine holidays – Canada Day, Labour Day, Thanksgiving Day, Remembrance Day, Christmas Day, Boxing Day, New Year’s Day, Good Friday, and Victoria Day – are mandated federal holidays. These holidays celebrate and/or commemorate special events or individuals.

Provincially the number of statutory holidays vary. Ontario has eight recognized holidays; Remembrance Day is not a statutory holiday in Ontario. The Civic Holiday, also known as Simcoe Day, and Family Day are regionally designated holidays in Ontario.

Boxing Day
The day after Christmas, Dec. 26, is the Feast of St. Stephen, the first Christian martyr. This day is also known as Boxing Day, as church poor boxes are opened. In Canada and many western countries, the day is observed as a public holiday. The day is celebrated by many in giving or purchasing gifts. It is also customary to hold sporting activities on the day. 
Canada Day
This day celebrates the anniversary of July 1, 1867, which is the date of the Constitution Act. Many Canadians enjoy festive activities with family and friends including outdoor activities, sharing meals and observing fireworks. It is a statutory holiday in Ontario.  
Civic Holiday (ON)
This day celebrates the anniversary of July 1, 1867, which is the date of the Constitution Act. Many Canadians enjoy festive activities with family and friends including outdoor activities, sharing meals and observing fireworks. It is a statutory holiday in Ontario.
Family Day (ON)
Family Day is celebrated on the third Monday in February in Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, PEI and Saskatchewan, and the second Monday in February in BC.  
Labour Day
This day celebrates working people and is held on the first Monday of September. Celebrations include picnics, water activities, fireworks and public events. For many, it is a last chance to travel before the school year begins. 
New Year's Day
New Year’s Day has been celebrated as a holiday by Western nations for more than 400 years. Celebrations include making of resolutions for the year to come, parties on the evening of Dec. 31 and a toast at midnight when the New Year officially begins. On New Year's Day itself, many people watch football games, parades and spend the day with family and friends.
Remembrance Day
Remembrance Day commemorates the armistice signed to end the First World War at 11 a.m. on Nov. 11, 1918, being the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of that year. Every year on Nov. 11, Canadians pause in a silent moment of remembrance for the men and women who have served, and continue to serve, our country during times of war, conflict and peace.
Thanksgiving Day
This North American tradition celebrates the harvest and is a time to give thanks. Families and friends gather together to enjoy meals.
Victoria Day
Canadians celebrate Queen Victoria’s birthday on the Monday proceeding May 24, which is her actual birthday. This is a statutory holiday in Ontario.